WHY LIST WITH A BROKER? – Luke Buchanan

WHEN SHOULD YOU WORK WITH A REALTOR?

When you have property to sell at a premium, you want to work with someone who keeps his finger on the pulse of DC’s housing market, with someone who sets realistic expectations for sellers and who does not jump on the first offer that comes in.

The last few months have been an unforgettable experience, trying find the right buyer in one of the hottest neighborhoods in D.C. Proudly representing the seller of this exchange and selling at 100% of list price. http://www.LukeTheRealtor.com

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Luke Buchanan delivers in-depth, local knowledge regarding NW Washington neighborhoods. Luke is proficient in relative-valuation and formerly worked as a strategist for an advertising firm in Santa Monica. If you wish to learn more about your home’s worth, please call or email to schedule a free real estate consultation today. You may also visit Luke Buchanan’s blog or Facebook, to find additional information that may further guide your real estate decisions. Hobbies include: golf, grilling, image editing, photography, running, skiing, tennis, travel and yoga

 

WHEN SHOULD YOU WORK WITH A REALTOR?

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Cherry Blossom Festival 2014 – Pink & White Petals

Cherry Blossom Festival 2014 - Pink & White Pedals

Cherry Blossom Festival 2014

Cherry Blossom Festival 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Cherry_Blossom_Festival

The National Cherry Blossom Festival (全米桜祭り Zenbei Sakura Matsuri?) is a spring celebration in Washington, D.C., commemorating the March 27, 1912, gift of Japanese cherry trees from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo City to the city of Washington. Mayor Ozaki donated the trees in an effort to enhance the growing friendship between the United States and Japan and also celebrate the continued close relationship between the two nations.[1] Giant colorful helium balloons, elaborate floats, the energy-filled Parade, marching bands from across the country and a grand spectacle of music and showmanship seen only once a year are parts of the Festival.[2]

The first “Cherry Blossom Festival” was held in 1935 under joint sponsorship by numerous civic groups, becoming an annual event. The cherry trees had by this point become an established part of the nation’s capital. In 1938, plans to cut down trees to clear ground for the Jefferson Memorial prompted a group of women to chain themselves together at the site in protest. A compromise was reached where more trees would be planted along the south side of the Basin to frame the Memorial. A Cherry Blossom Pageant was begun in 1940.[3]

On December 11, 1941, four trees were cut down. It is suspected that this was retaliation for the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan four days earlier, though this was never confirmed. In hopes of dissuading people from further attacks upon the trees during the war, they were referred to as “Oriental” flowering cherry trees for the war’s duration.[3] Suspended during World War II, the festival resumed in 1947 with the support of the Washington, D.C., Board of Trade and the D.C. Commissioners.[citation needed]

In 1948, the Cherry Blossom Princess and U.S. Cherry Blossom Queen program were started by the National Conference of State Societies. A Princess was selected from each state and federal territory, with a queen chosen to reign over the festival. In 1952, Japan requested help restoring the cherry tree grove at Adachi, Tokyo along the Arakawa River, which was the parent stock of the D.C. trees but had diminished during the war. In response, the National Park Service sent budwood back to Tokyo.[3]

The Japanese ambassador gave a 300-year old stone lantern to the city of Washington to commemorate the signing of the 1854 Japan-US Treaty of Amity and Friendship by Commodore Matthew C. Perry. For a number of years, the lighting of this lantern formally opened the Festival. Three years later, the president of the pearl company started by Mikimoto Kōkichi donated the Mikimoto Pearl Crown. Containing more than five pounds of gold and 1,585 pearls, the crown is used at the coronation of the Festival Queen at the Grand Ball. The next year, the Mayor of Yokohama gifted a stone pagoda to the City to “symbolize the spirit of friendship between the United States of America manifested in the Treaty of Peace, Amity and Commerce signed at Yokohama on March 31, 1854.”[3]

Lady Bird Johnson plants a cherry tree along the Tidal Basin during the 1965 National Cherry Blossom Festival.

The Japanese gave 3,800 more Yoshino trees in 1965, which were accepted by First Lady Lady Bird Johnson. These trees were grown in the United States and many were planted on the grounds of the Washington Monument. For the occasion, the First Lady and Ryuji Takeuchi, wife of the Japanese ambassador, reenacted the 1912 planting. In 1982, Japanese horticulturalists took cuttings from Yoshino trees in Washington, D.C., to replace cherry trees that had been destroyed in a flood in Japan. From 1986 to 1988, 676 cherry trees were planted using US$101,000 in private funds donated to the National Park Service to restore the trees to the number at the time of the original gift.[3]

In 1994, the Festival was expanded to two weeks to accommodate the many activities that happen during the trees’ blooming.[6] Two years later, the Potomac and Arakawa became sister rivers. Cuttings were taken from the documented 1912 trees in 1997 to be used in replacement plantings and thus preserve the genetic heritage of the grove. In 1999, fifty trees of the Usuzumi variety from Motosu, Gifu, were planted in West Potomac Park. According to legend, these trees were first planted by Emperor Keitai in the 6th century and were designated a National Treasure of Japan in 1922.[3] From 2002 to 2006, 400 trees propagated from the surviving 1912 trees were planted to ensure the genetic heritage of the original donation is maintained.[3]

 

Hirshorn – “Delta Theta” 1961, Morris Louis

Morris Louis, American, b. Baltimore, Maryland, 1912–1962

Magna on canvas, 102 3/4 x 164 in.

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Marcella Louis Brenner, 1997

Accession Number: 97.1

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection, Washington Color School

32 American Presidents Share Their Best Life Advice

32 American Presidents Share Their Best Life Advice

Some of them hated it. Some of them loved it. All of them learned from it.

Since George Washington’s inauguration, 43 men have occupied the White House to perform one of the most difficult jobs in the world. Some defined their terms with great accomplishments or grave misjudgments; others barely made a mark on history. Yet all strove to fulfill their mandate to the best of their abilities and live up to the incredible expectations placed upon them.

Whether they succeeded or failed, our fascination with presidents’ leadership styles, habits, decisions and personalities continue long after they leave office. Their perspectives and pronouncements are dissected over and over as we seek to understand what these men, who went through an experience most Americans can barely conceptualize, can teach us about life.

In honor of Presidents’ Day, we’ve rounded up a list of some of the best advice from 32 presidents past and present on how to do and be your best, no matter how challenging your job is.

George Washington Quote

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George Washington, 1789-1797: “Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for ’tis better to be alone than in bad company.”

John Adams, 1797-1801: “You will ever remember that all the end of study is to make you a good man and a useful citizen.”

Thomas Jefferson, 1801-1809: “When angry, count ten, before you speak; if very angry, a hundred.

James Monroe, 1817-1825: “It is by a thorough knowledge of the whole subject that [people] are enabled to judge correctly of the past and to give a proper direction to the future.”

John Quincy Adams, 1825-1829: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

Andrew Jackson Quote

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Andrew Jackson, 1829-1837: “Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, stop thinking and go in.”

Martin Van Buren, 1837-1841: “All the lessons of history and experience must be lost upon us if we are content to trust alone to the peculiar advantages we happen to possess.”

John Tyler, 1841-1845: “Wealth can only be accumulated by the earnings of industry and the savings of frugality.”

Millard Fillmore, 1850-1853: “An honorable defeat is better than a dishonorable victory.”

James Buchanan, 1857-1861: “A long visit to a friend is often a great bore. Never make people twice glad.”

Abraham Lincoln, 1861-1865: “Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed, is more important than any other one thing.”

Ulysses S. Grant, 1869-1877: “The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.”

Rutherford B. Hayes, 1877-1881: “For honest merit to succeed amid the tricks and intrigues which are now so lamentably common, I know is difficult; but the honor of success is increased by the obstacles which are to be surmounted. Let me triumph as a man or not at all.”

James Garfield, 1881: “Be fit for more than the thing you are now doing. Let everyone know that you have a reserve in yourself; that you have more power than you are now using. If you are not too large for the place you occupy, you are too small for it.”

Chester Arthur, 1881-1885: “Good ball players make good citizens.”

Grover Cleveland, 1885-1889, 1893-1897: “Whatever you do, tell the truth.”

Teddy Roosevelt Quote

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Teddy Roosevelt, 1901-1909: “We must dare to be great; and we must realize that greatness is the fruit of toil and sacrifice and high courage.”

William Taft, 1909-1913: “Don’t write so that you can be understood, write so that you can’t be misunderstood.”

Woodrow Wilson, 1913-1921: “One cool judgment is worth a thousand hasty counsels. The thing to be supplied is light, not heat.”

Calvin Coolidge, 1923-1929: “Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb … Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.”

Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945: “Yours is not the task of making your way in the world, but the task of remaking the world which you will find before you.”

Harry S. Truman, 1945-1953: “I have found the best way to give advice to your children is to find out what they want and then advise them to do it.”

Dwight Eisenhower, 1953-1961: “Neither a wise man or a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him.”

JFK Quote

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John F. Kennedy, 1961-1963: “Life is never easy. There is work to be done and obligations to be met — obligations to truth, to justice, and to liberty.”

Lyndon B. Johnson, 1963-1969: “If we succeed, it will not be because of what we have, but it will be because of what we are; not because of what we own, but, rather because of what we believe.”

Richard Nixon, 1969-1974: “The American dream does not come to those who fall asleep.”

Jimmy Carter, Jr., 1977-1981: “Piling up material goods cannot fill the emptiness of lives which have no confidence or purpose.”

Ronald Reagan, 1981-1989: “The future doesn’t belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave.”

George H.W. Bush, 1989-1993: “No problem of human making is too great to be overcome by human ingenuity, human energy, and the untiring hope of the human spirit.”

Bill Clinton, 1993-2001: “If you live long enough, you’ll make mistakes. But if you learn from them, you’ll be a better person. It’s how you handle adversity, not how it affects you. The main thing is never quit, never quit, never quit.”

George W. Bush, 2001-2009: “Life takes its own turns, makes its own demands, writes its own story, and along the way, we start to realize we are not the author.”

Obama Quote

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Barack Obama, 2009-present: “One voice can change a room. And if one voice can change a room, then it can change a city. And if it can change a city, it can change a state. And if it can change a state, it can change a nation, and if it can change a nation, it can change the world. Your voice can change the world.”

PLANS TO BUILD A CONDOLA CONNECTING GEORGETOWN TO ROSSLYN

VISITING THE PLANS TO BUILD A CONDOLA CONNECTING GEORGETOWN TO ROSSLYN

January 30, 2014

by Lark Turner

image
A rendering of the gondola. Georgetown BID.

Georgetown is one step closer to getting a gondola — or at least one step closer to commissioning a study to figure out whether or not a gondola is possible.

The group advancing a 15-year plan for the neighborhood, Georgetown 2028, announced on Thursday that it has raised half the money for a feasibility study that will determine whether moving forward with a gondola connecting Georgetown and Rosslyn is indeed possible. An exact cost for the study has yet to be determined, but the group has raised $100,000 from private donors.

The next step is getting DDOT to pitch in another $100,000 so the neighborhood can move forward with soliciting bids from companies who would conduct the study. Asked whether getting that money from DDOT is likely, Joe Sternlieb, CEO of the Georgetown Business Improvement District, confidently replied “yes.”

In addition to the usual engineering challenges, the study will need to include input from organizations like the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), since helicopters regularly fly along the river. Sternlieb said he’d like to have the study complete by the end of 2014, though he acknowledged that timeline was ambitious.

image
UrbanTurf’s streetcar-inspired rendering of the gondola, by Capital Pixel

Georgetown 2028 has attracted support from local businesses, organizations, councilmembers and the neighborhood’s ANC. At its core is a set of 75 action items the neighborhood would like to see implemented over the next 15 years, most of which relate to transportation improvements. The rest seek to ramp up use of public space, including making the C&O Canal more of a destination, and improve Georgetown’s economy, especially in less-trafficked areas like K Street.

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A rendering of the streetcar. Via cox, graae and + spack architects

In addition to the gondola, the BID is advocating heavily on behalf of bringing a streetcar and eventually adding subway service to the neighborhood. The streetcar connecting Union Station and Georgetown would run along K Street NW, New Jersey Avenue NW and H Street. Georgetown University wants the streetcar to continue to campus, so the BID, DDOT and the University are looking into whether that’s feasible.

On a smaller scale, a few of the short term goals are near completion. Signage to help pedestrians navigate the neighborhood is up first, since the BID happened on some previously approved signs in a DDOT warehouse. They plan to have the signs put up in the neighborhood by March 15.